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20121027
20121104
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 11
LANGUAGE
English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
to return the rates to. and the 2000s which he did not mention when george bush followed the policies very similar to what mitt romney is proposing, they brief last word on that? >> well, i think as we are talking about four years what is going to happen the next four years. that say time where a president can make a tremendous difference. and we're talking about the past four years. and the president could have made auch betr policy with the unemployment being so high. >> brown: all right, john taylor and austan goolsbee, thanks so much. >> thank you >> brown: and if you're ready for more analysis on the jobs numbers, you'll find it, as always, on paul solman's "making sense" page online. >> woodruff: still to come on the newshour: misery in the aftermath of the super-storm; civilian deaths in syria; a spotlight on immigration in iowa; plus, shields and brooks. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the news on bs wasn't enough to lift wall street today. instead, stocks sank on worries that the costs of hurricane sandy will eat into profits. the dow jones in
. and the 2000s which he did not mention when george bush followed the policies very similar to what mitt romney is proposing, theyic if one or e other is elected. >> right. you know, i was in the white house for a while and i used to joke, i crawled all around in the basement, i have yet to find that switch down there that you just flip it and then everything gets better. i think 90 plus percent of what happens in a growing economy has nothing to do with washington. what the president and what washington in general can do is try to set the stage and set a groundwork for policy at could encourage growth. and i think the shorter term that you are thinking about, the less can be done specifically by the president. so if you are asking over a one month or three month period, there's very little the president can do. if you start asking over a five year, ten year period, then the policy decisions they make can influence quite a lot the way things go. >> brown: and john taylor, brief last word on that? >> well, i think as we are talking about four years what is going to happen the next four years. th
than what george bush ran on, george w. bush in 2000 and 2004 and i don't know that voter are saying that is the same old plan. i know president had suggested that, but i think what he's talking about is far different in terms of turning the economy around. i don't think voters are necessarily making -- >> the polls don't show. that polls show that voters, women and men blame the hole we got in to on george bush, you can't get away from that. >> you don't hear any talk about it between the two candidates. >> actually i do hear it. >> voters are smarters than most of the pollsters i have to say. they understand that it's not one man or one -- >> that's what that he say to the pollsters. i don't think you can avoid that. the reason i think the economy has -- as much as it should that he has made no definitive case for why he would be better. his so-called plan still leaves the very richest getting the very most. everybody knows that. he hasn't in fact come forward with something that really separates him from the bush years. >> i disagree with the whole recommend takes we're not hearin
reckless policies and he has praised george bush as a good economic steward and dick cheney as someone with great judgment and wisdom. >> attacking me is not an agenda. attacking me is not talking about how we deal with the challenges in the middle east. >> charles krauthammer is off this week, but after the date, i ard him say on fox news that romney had won a debate not just tactically, but strategically. in this week's column, he said that the president's tone petty ends on that romney looked presidential bid -- petty and small that romney looked presidential. >> mitt essentially agreed with president obama on all of the key issues. >> sound like he was running for secretary of state to succeed hillary clinton. >> he agreed with him on a afghanistan, iraq, iran. he was trying to tone down and become residential -- i don't know if that was the case. he was set back on his heels by obama's direct challenge him. i know that he looked presidential at all. -- i don't think he looked presidential at all. he was captive to his talking points and once he got off the talking points, all he c
. >> many americans have grown tired of what their country had come to represent under george w. bush. obama promised change at home and abroad. he brought an end to the war in iraq. he said u.s. combat forces would pull out of afghanistan by the end of 2014. and he promised to decimate al qaeda. >> after a fire fight they killed osama bin laden and took custody of his body. we can say to those families who have lost loved ones to al qaeda's terror, justice has been done. >> but some argue obama has not met expectations in the middle east. he's faced persistent trouble with a dominant player in the region, iran. he has focused foreign policy to make it more multilateral, part of what he calls a broader shift. aft a dade in whi we fought two wars that cost us dearly, in blood and treasure, the united states is turning our attention to the vast potential of the asia-pacific region. >> reporter: obama turned his attention at home to pushing through health care reform, something president after president had tried to do. he succeeded with what became known as obama care, the most significant ove
wisconsin had the most counties in the nation to vote for george bush in 2004 and then switch to barack obama in 2008. brown county was one of them. but then it swung back to republican scott walker for governor in 2010. the question is what next? st. norbert college political scientist wendy scattergood says that even in a deeply divided electorate, the wisconsin tradition of tough-minded independent voters is alive and well. >> they tend to be moderates. they do want to see bi- partisanship. they want to see people working together. and so when they get really frustrated or if their perception is that either on the right of the left that they're moving too far to the extreme, they throw them out of office. but having done that only two years ago it wouldn't surprise you that this state could flip again? yeah, absolutely. we have a tradition of being very, very closely matched between democrats and republicans, so those independents n make all the differenc >> you can canvass, phone, input data, whatever you want. >> reporter: how many persuadables are there? that's also being pursued
cheney or george w. bush. peace, peace, peace, the new mitt, would have the new nixon in 68y. i mean the new improved mitt, he did the same thing on iran sanctions. he was talking about an aerial strike, he was talking about an invasion, attk un ian a recently as months ago. and now he is saying oh i'm all for sauntions. we have to do it peacefully and diplomatically. so i mean who is this man. you know, that is -- >> i feel like we're coming to the end of this campaign with the two large questions unanswered, crucial questions. would mitt romney buff the republican party at any time if he were elected president. and secondly, does barack obama have sort of a second wind, a second burst of policy creative. >> woodruff: he did put out this 20 page. >> but that was a rehash statement of his. if y go to what he ote in 2007, i bet most of those things are in that 2007 book. and so they're fine. you know, community colleges, more math and science teachers and all that stuff. but it's not exactly a huge agenda. so you are a voter. you are trying to imagine what is the next four years going
, and george w. bush. >> woodruff: dan, what about a role for governor romney at a time like this? >> well, it's minimal at this point. i mean he really has to remain essentially iisibe. he can't lok like he's trng to do anyingoxplit the politics of the moment. so in a sense there's more potential up side for president obama, but as susan said more potential down side for governor romney i think it is a matter of just kind of waiting and watching and then deciding at what point he can go back out. i mean one of the issues is, does this short circuit kind of the surge of energy that we've seen around the romney campaign? there's no question that there is more energy out there in the republican base and at events he's been holding. does this affect that in some way that would be detrimental to him? ese are all he questions that we n't answer tight. >> woruff: because we just don't know when they're going to be back on the trail. there's no way to gauge that. >> that's exactly right. i mean, we obviously know they'll be back out at some point later in the week. but we don't know quite they will b
george w. bush. carmona also served as sheriffs deputy along the u.s. border with mexico. democrats hope that bipartisan background can appeal to the independents, who make up a third of the state's voters. the candidate talks about republican efforts to recruit him while he served in as rgeon genel. >> the republican party did ask me to become a republican. i said why? i was an independent my whole life, because i always thought that there were good sides-- both sides had good solutions to problems. unfortunately, we got so partisan now that democracy's in the gridlock, because nobody can agree on compromising. compromise becomes a four-letter word. >> reporter: and in the grand canyon state one issue and one hispanics make up 15% of arizona's registered voters, and a recent survey showed they favor carmona over flake by a six-to-one ratio. but in arizona, like elsewhere in the country, hispanics have not turned out to vote in the same numbers as other groups. if democrats can mobilize latinos in large enough numbers, they could win the election and that turns daniel valenzuela into one
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)